Woods of Net

Woods of Net is a permanent pavilion for Japanese net artist Toshiko Horiuchi Macadam, in collaboration with structural engineers TIS & PARTNERS.

Toshiko Horiuchi Macadam knitted the net entirely by hand, which is designed for children to crawl in, roll around, and jump on the net.

The architects hoped the pavilion would allow people to mingle like at a campfire. (Photo credit: Abel Erazo)

The architectures wanted the artwork to be easily seen from outside while being mindful not to expose it to the rain or ultraviolet light. They hoped to design a space soft like the forest where the boundary between outside and inside disappears, and where it allows people to mingle like at a campfire. The children play inside of the net just as fire while parents sit around on the woods.

Woods of Net is situated at the Hakone Open-Air Museum, an open museum located in one of the most visited tourist spots in Japan.  (Photo credit: Abel Erazo)

The structure is entirely constructed of timbers without any metal parts. 320 cubic metres of timber members are used and all the 589 members are not the same. The latest structural programme was developed for the pavilion, but the joint techniques are derived from thousands years old Japanese wooden temples in Nara and Kyoto. As long as the proper maintenance is ensured, it can last for over 300 years. The architecture is one of the rare structures in the world that embodies the newest and oldest building techniques.

The joint techniques are derived from thousands years old Japanese wooden temples in Nara and Kyoto.  (Photo credit: Abel Erazo)

The architecture is one of the rare structures in the world that embodies the newest and oldest building techniques. (Photo credit: Abel Erazo)

Situated at the Hakone Open-Air Museum, an open museum located in one of the most visited tourist spots in Japan, the Woods of Net pavilion was an addition to the collection of art in celebration of their 40th anniversary.